Current Affairs

Re Issue of an article by The Slogg [ref Saudi-Yemen]

https://hat4uk.wordpress.com/2015/08/29/at-the-end-of-the-day-662/  Link to full article

Since last Wednesday, crude oil prices have been rising until the global median reached $45.Tanks need oil, and now that the Saudis have invaded North Yemen – seizing control of two areas in the Saada province – demand may go up. Really? Enough to evoke a 5-bucks rise? The rationale for the invasion is the Saudi need to counter growing retaliatory attacks by Yemeni forces on Saudi soil. Um, just run that past me again: ‘to counter growing retaliatory attacks’? Always get your retaliation in first, that’s what I say.

Fate of the Rohingya at sea

Rohingya on a Boat

Rohingya on a Boat
Rohingya on a Boat

Similar to the EU washing its hands off the refugees trying to cross from Libya into the relative safety of Europe. a similar but worse fate is facing the Rohingya.

It has now been a few years since the oppression of the Rohingya has come to the fore - from around the time the brutal military regime controling Myanmar "democratised", The Rohingya are the current bogeymen of Myanmar.

They have been persecuted, robbed of their rights and are not considered citizens of the country despite their presence being traced back to these locations for atleast a thousand years.

Our responsibility to Libya

Libya

Map showing Libya
Map showing Libya

Today another tragedy is in the news - hundreds of Libyans - estimated at upto 700 - have drowned to death when their boat capsized in the Mediterranean sea.

These people were escaping the chaos of Libya trying to get to the stability of Europe. This is not the first such incident, but many Libyans have made the calculation tha the situation in Libya is so dangerous, these risks are worth taking.

The news reports will treat this latest even as a tragedy, but those who read about it won't get a sense of what is happening or our responsibility.

The war in Yemen

Yemen

Yemen
Yemen
Author: 
Helen Lackner

International media talk constantly of Huthi forces, but in reality the main military force in Yemen is now that of ex-president Saleh who, wherever he is, is doing what he promised: destroying as much as he possibly can.

The war which has now started is what many of us feared for so long and hoped, against all rational thinking, would be avoided. And this time, let us not fool ourselves with misguided optimism, this will be long and as awful as any war can be. While political and even military internal struggles are hardly a novelty in Yemen, the new element is that the conflict has now added a major layer of international ‘proxy’ features which will only worsen the situation, making it reminiscent of the Lebanese civil war in the 1970s-80s. 

The legacy of a good Muslim

deah-yusur-razan.jpg

Deah, Yusur and Razan - three young Muslims killed in America
Deah, Yusur and Razan - three young Muslims killed in America

Last Ramadan was the first time I understood the beauty of being a good Muslim and its affects after death. There are people who work to leave a legacy but I think being a good Muslim alone can create that legacy.

A good Muslim will always continue to be remembered and will inspire others with their good character; by their loved ones but even possibly complete strangers. I’ve learnt enough about my grandparents and other deceased members of my family to know the former is true. The latter is what I learnt last Ramadan.

How should the UK deal with returnees from Syria?

yusufsarwar.jpg

Yusuf Sarwar was arrested and then convicted after returning from Syria
Photos of Yusuf Sarwar

There is a story on BBC News today: a mother who cooperated with the police when she found out about her son, Yusuf Sarwar, had traveled to Syria to fight felt betrayed by his arrest and subsequent 12 years and 8 months sentence under the anti terrorism laws.

His mother Majida told the BBC she believed the sentence would discourage other Muslims from helping the police.

There is a question of how these returnees should be treated. Should they be incarcerated and seen as a problem? Surely they cannot be left alone, after coming back from carrying out "terrorist activities" abroad?

3 dead in Kashmir protests

 

SRINAGAR, India — Three young people have died in violence in Indian-controlled Kashmir despite a curfew that continued for a third day Monday following the execution of a Kashmiri man convicted in a deadly 2001 attack on India’s Parliament.

Mohammed Afzal Guru was hanged in New Delhi early Saturday. Ahead of the execution, authorities ordered people in most of the Indian-held part of the disputed Kashmir region to remain indoors indefinitely in anticipation of anti-India protests.

 

Despite the curfew, protests and clashes between troops and demonstrators broke out at a dozen places in the region Monday. Police and paramilitary soldiers fired tear gas and used batons to chase away rock-throwing protesters, police said.

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